Time for Book Club of the 1st!

Good evening all!

I am so tired I can’t keep my eyes open. Phew. Please forgive me for not catching any errors. I am having a difficult time staying awake for simply editing this post. Oh my.

Super busy weekend working with my pals over at the PNWA (Pacific Northwest Writers Association) putting on their summer conference. And yes, I caught folks playing Pokemon Go, but not in the pitch sessions. Not quite as entertaining playing in the lobby of the hotel, but still made me smile.

Meanwhile…

I finally finished STORM FRONT, Jim Butcher’s first published book, and the first in the Dresden Files series. Bravo! Great book. I’m a pretty critical reader, so I don’t say this lightly. This to me, is what boils down to a paranormal action adventure beach read. Super easy to digest. I’d give it an A.

IMG_4016

My much loved copy of Storm Front.

This book has been everywhere with me over the past two months, including but not limited to therapy, school functions, Montana, Idaho, California, and of course, lost in bag x between it all. It belongs to my oldest kid, Bunnywabit, and won’t he be upset with me when he sees how badly the book fared. Note: I’m not normally this hard on books. Its been a busy two months.

Okay, lets get to it! I’ll put my questions up here, then do a comment with each question below, and my comments of course, so there is a place to answer. Please feel free to answer as many or as few as you want ;-).

Let’s start with the description from Mr. Butcher’s website:

“Harry Dresden is the best at what he does. Well, technically, he’s the only at what he does. So when the Chicago P.D. has a case that transcends mortal creativity or capability, they come to him for answers. For the “everyday” world is actually full of strange and magical things — and most of them don’t play well with humans. That’s where Harry comes in. Takes a wizard to catch a — well, whatever.

There’s just one problem. Business, to put it mildly, stinks. So when the police bring him in to consult on a grisly double murder committed with black magic, Harry’s seeing dollar signs. But where there’s black magic, there’s a black mage behind it. And now that mage knows Harry’s name. And that’s when things start to get… interesting.

Magic. It can get a guy killed.”

This book was published in April of 2000 I believe. From his About Jim page, where it talks about how he got published, it looks like it was written in the mid 90’s. He’d already finished the third book in the series before this one was picked up.

After this point folks, if you haven’t read it stop reading here. There are spoilers below.

I was having a huge amount of problems coming up with questions on this one. I feel I’m usually pretty good at digging deep into a story and sussing out things others don’t see. This time, its such a light book that it was tough.

However.

I found myself drawing a parallel between Butcher’s wizarding world and JK Rowling’s. Both heroes were named Harry. That’s a little funny. They were both conceived about the same time. Also funny. But Butcher’s was in an adult world and Rowling’s was in a kid’s world. Which is where my question start:

  1. In Butcher’s world, adult wizards are kick ass. Oh. My. Gosh. Loved it. In Rowling’s the adults really weren’t, at least to the naked eye, because it was basically focussing on the kids. Do you think that Storm Front is a totally different scenario and that the wizards are just way better at their craft than in Rowling’s world? Or do you you think that the adults in Rowling’s world were pretty awesome and we never saw it?
  2. Am I crazy to see the parallels? And then, moving on to other questions…
  3. Was the magic believable? Was there any point where you were you thought it was too outlandish?
  4. I’m going to give a nod back to some questions I asked earlier, see link below. How old do you think Harry is?
  5. Was there enough of a romance for you? To little? Too much?
  6. Did you like the pacing?
  7. Were there too many given’s in this world, like: was it too easy that Harry worked with the police department? Was it too easy that things died that easy? Did he conveniently forget things or just not do things that would harm/do him good?
  8. Was it believable that Morgan forgave him and didn’t kill him, even after he’d pretty brutally beat him up?
  9. What did you think about the villain(s)? Any complaints?
  10. Did anyone have problems reading this? I mean, seriously? It had to be the smoothest read I’ve undertaken in ages. A beach read for the paranormal action adventure type.
  11. Again, a note to the blog down below: How did you feel about the description of his surrounding? As in, his office, his home, the final house they battled in? Could you picture them?
  12. Are you going to read more of the books in the series?

Here’s the first part of of the questions that came to mind, along with some thoughtful comments, STORM FRONT Discussion, Part 1. I’m using a template that won’t allow me to sticky things to the top of the page – so I apologize for not having that one up top for perusal.

What are your thoughts?

Now I’m going to go before I fall over on the keyboard. Night all.

***Edited to add: I should have offered a contest that if you can find an error I’ll send you a shopping bag or something ;-). Thanks to my anonymous helpers! Please feel free to share if you find something. I’m still not quite recovered.

Advertisements

35 thoughts on “Time for Book Club of the 1st!

  1. In Butcher’s world, adult wizards are kick ass. Oh. My. Gosh. Loved it. In Rowland’s the adults really weren’t, at least to the naked eye, because it was basically focussing on the kids. Do you think that Storm Front is a totally different scenario and that the wizards are just way better at their craft than in Rowland’s world? Or do you you think that the adults in Rowland’s world were pretty awesome and we never saw it?

    • I think the Adults are totally kickass in Rowland’s world. And they are busy doing Adult things ‘off screen’ all of the time. And, even though it does all seem to fall to Harry, Ron and Hermoine, that is certainly not because the Adults are abdicating their responsibilities.

      • I agree on the adults being written well, they just didn’t show how amazing their magic was on a consistent basis. Also makes sense being the story was for all intensive purposes based on school children/teens. But what I’m wondering is if they will show how kick ass the adults *magic* is in the new movie. Hoping…

    • Of course I don’t think I am lol. That crazy energy that floats through the universe that allows someone in England and someone in Anytown USA to come up with a similar theme… Its totally real.

    • I’m betting Butcher was making Harry in his late 30’s physically, but because Butcher himself was in his early 20’s when he wrote it the character shows some of those characteristics. Makes sense now to me.

    • I again was thrown off by how the romance was handled at first, until I realized the age of the writer. Then it was fitting. I think that part *could* have been handled a little better, but, great book, I’ll take it.

    • I think it shows Harry as someone who’s life is a LOT screwed up and he doesn’t really want a committed relationship, a bit of a player. I love his relationship with Murphy (when she isn’t beating the crap out of him for doing something really stupid), you can tell he is in love with her, but she won’t give him a chance. It’s kind of like that Moonlighting romance, always a deep connection but very over the top dramatic. I’m really interested to see how everything progresses in all his books after this. Especially as the author progressively gets older. 🙂

    • Ha ha – I was tired when I wrote that. Bad English woman! Anyhow, Mm, I think sometimes things didn’t die when they should have. Others, they came back when they should have. Didn’t matter. Still a believer.

    • At one time I realized all he had to do was talk to the crime boss, its been a busy week/end so I’m forgetting the exact scene, but I was shouting at the book “all you have to do is talk to the mob boss!” Anyhow, he did mention that in the end of the book, so perhaps he noticed it too.

  2. Again, a note to the blog down below: How did you feel about the description of his surrounding? As in, his office, his home, the final house they battled in? Could you picture them?

    • Here is one of the places the story fell apart for me. Butcher’s description of surroundings is lacking. In a big way. I’ve read a few of his later books, and I felt those problems had been ironed out for the most part by then. But as far as this book goes as a stand alone, I could not picture many of the locals he described. His home. His office. The house where the sex magic was going on. I can’t believe I just wrote that. He he.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s